The girls I mean are not refined

August 19, 2014 at 6:32pm
4,633 notes
Reblogged from timemagazine
ananthymous:

nickiluzada:

timemagazine:

How magic conquered pop culture: ”In the real world we’re busy staring at our phones as global warming gradually renders the world we’re ignoring uninhabitable. Fantasy holds out the possibility that there’s another way to live.” 
Illustration by Nick Iluzada for TIME.

Just going to reblog this here too soooooo

This is so cool

ananthymous:

nickiluzada:

timemagazine:

How magic conquered pop culture: ”In the real world we’re busy staring at our phones as global warming gradually renders the world we’re ignoring uninhabitable. Fantasy holds out the possibility that there’s another way to live.” 

Illustration by Nick Iluzada for TIME.

Just going to reblog this here too soooooo

This is so cool

August 14, 2014 at 1:04pm
6,873 notes
Reblogged from nannaia

memoircomics:

nannaia:

This is a hairstyle timeline that is meant to cover the Taishō era (1912-1926). However the dates for many reference photographs were rather vague, so some might actually fall into Shōwa era (1926-1989). Regrettably I couldn’t cover EVERY single hairstyle from this period so please consider this to be a brief overview. There are no Geisha, Maiko, etc featured here; they will be covered in another fashion timeline someday.

Some interesting notes about Meiji-Taisho era from Liza Crihfield Dalby’s Kimono: Fashioning Culture (1993)

·         “Men and women of Meiji had gulped up Western culture with all the indiscriminate enthusiasm of new converts. By Taishō, Japanese sensibilities vis-à-vis the West were much smoother. This was Japan’s political equivalent of the … social scene of the American Roaring Twenties. Japanese born during Taishō would enter adolescence as modern boys and girls. Significantly, women opened their closets to Western clothing during this decade. Kimono has lost space ever since.” (pg. 124)

·         “By 1915 Japan was beginning to feel itself a world-class nation, more confident of its military strength and social development. Ordinary Japanese were inclined to look at their society in light of how life might be bettered by adapting foreign ideas, or made more interesting by acquiring foreign fashions. Borrowing from the West was of course not new, but it had now become a more reciprocal and respectable process.” (pg. 124)

WOMEN’s HAIR:

·         In the Meiji era “a few women cropped their hair, but these courageous souls were simply regarded as weird” and indecent (pg. 75)

·         “If cutting the hair short was too radical [in Meiji Japan], as public reaction attests, women’s hair did gain a new option in the sokugami style, a pompadour resembling the chignons worn by Charles Dana Gibson’s popular Gibson girls. The further the front section, or ‘eaves,’ of the hair protruded, the more daring the style. The sokugami style bunched the hair, coiling it in a bun at the crown of the head. Unlike traditional coiffures, sokugami did not require the heavy use of pomade, pins, bars, strings, and false hair to hold its shape. Its appeal was promoted as healthier and more rational – hence, more enlightened- than the old ways.” (pg. 75)

the people in these photos are some of the most beautiful i’ve ever seen?!?!?!?!?!??!

(via anatomicalart)

August 13, 2014 at 11:49pm
33,727 notes
Reblogged from modestdemidov

aeon-fux:

modestdemidov:

now picture demon me with something like 50000000 times bigger than this

the person who made this video needs to contact me asap 

what is this magical creature

(via riannafinch)

11:38pm
39,990 notes
Reblogged from burdge
burdge:

ok but hear me out- what about a lightning bolt scar that looked like real lightning?

burdge:

ok but hear me out- what about a lightning bolt scar that looked like real lightning?

(via tinyshell)

August 10, 2014 at 6:52pm
8,423 notes
Reblogged from nprfreshair
nprfreshair:

In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.
For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.
Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.
In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,
Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study. 
This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave. 
image via NPR

this was one of the coolest things I learned in biology class. It’s got so many LAYERS to it. Like: Eternal life? But also shoddy ethics? And rampant abuse of capitalism? But also medical research?
also
hella

nprfreshair:

In 1951, an African-American woman named Henrietta Lacks was diagnosed with terminal cervical cancer. She was treated at Johns Hopkins University, where a doctor named George Gey snipped cells from her cervix without telling her. Gey discovered that Lacks’ cells could not only be kept alive, but would also grow indefinitely.

For the past 60 years Lacks’ cells have been cultured and used in experiments ranging from determining the long-term effects of radiation to testing the live polio vaccine. Her cells were commercialized and have generated millions of dollars in profit for the medical researchers who patented her tissue.

Lacks’ family, however, didn’t know the cell cultures existed until more than 20 years after her death.

In 2010 we spoke to Medical writer Rebecca Skloot who examines the legacy of Lacks’ contribution to science — and effect that has had on her family — in her bestselling book, The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks,


Now, 62 years later the Lacks family has given consent to this controversial medical contribution. Researchers who wish to use “HeLa” cells now have to submit a request and proposal that will be reviewed by the Lacks family. This new agreement is in the interest of respecting the family’s privacy, though, they still will not profit financially from any medical study.

This is a remarkable story, both medically and ethically, about the rights we have to our bodies, even beyond the grave.

image via NPR

this was one of the coolest things I learned in biology class. It’s got so many LAYERS to it. Like: Eternal life? But also shoddy ethics? And rampant abuse of capitalism? But also medical research?

also

hella

6:50pm
62 notes
Reblogged from chrisriddellblog
chrisriddellblog:

Neverwhere character sketch.

chrisriddellblog:

Neverwhere character sketch.

6:50pm
993 notes
Reblogged from medievalpoc
medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!
aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Kikunae Ikeda
[x]
Kikunae Ikeda / 池田 菊苗 (1864-1936) was a Japanese chemist and the inventor of MSG. (To all you haters: because Chinese restaurant syndrome has been debunked.)
He was also the first scientist to realise we have five basic tastes, not four. Before his time, Western science had accepted that our tongues have receptors for the following tastes:
1. sweetness
2. sourness
3. saltiness
4. bitterness.
 In 1909, he pointed out that there was a missing taste:
5. umami, or savouriness - i.e. the proteiny taste of meat or cheese or mushrooms or eggs.
This is kind of a big deal. It’s like pointing out that we have five fingers on each hand when Western science is only counting four.
So why the hell are we still teaching schoolkids that there are only four tastes, 105 years after that’s been proven wrong? Don’t we want them to understand why bacon is delicious????


cray

medievalpoc:

Math and Science Week!

aseantoo submitted to medievalpoc:

Kikunae Ikeda

[x]

Kikunae Ikeda / 池田 菊苗 (1864-1936) was a Japanese chemist and the inventor of MSG. (To all you haters: because Chinese restaurant syndrome has been debunked.)

He was also the first scientist to realise we have five basic tastes, not four. Before his time, Western science had accepted that our tongues have receptors for the following tastes:

1. sweetness

2. sourness

3. saltiness

4. bitterness.

 In 1909, he pointed out that there was a missing taste:

5. umami, or savouriness - i.e. the proteiny taste of meat or cheese or mushrooms or eggs.

This is kind of a big deal. It’s like pointing out that we have five fingers on each hand when Western science is only counting four.

So why the hell are we still teaching schoolkids that there are only four tastes, 105 years after that’s been proven wrong? Don’t we want them to understand why bacon is delicious????

cray

6:49pm
38,376 notes
Reblogged from ultrafacts
deducecanoe:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

ok. that’s being hella good at math. nasa uses you to double check the computers. and she’s an african american woman. betcha that’s why you never heard of her.

deducecanoe:

ultrafacts:

Source For more facts, Follow Ultrafacts

ok. that’s being hella good at math. nasa uses you to double check the computers.

and she’s an african american woman. betcha that’s why you never heard of her.

(via medievalpoc)

6:48pm
865 notes
Reblogged from laurentletadic
laurentletadic:

Nicholas Tolmachev

laurentletadic:

Nicholas Tolmachev

(via mayeko)

6:47pm
231 notes
Reblogged from gg-art
gg-art:

Preview of a thing I’m working on.

*explodes*

gg-art:

Preview of a thing I’m working on.

*explodes*